Green Tea Extract Helps You Lose Weight

green-tea-temiThe popularity of drinking tea has exponentially increased. According to, to the Tea Association in The US, over 158 million and around 165 million in the US and Great Britain drink tea, daily, respectively. In the Australian market, tea accounts for 13% of the overall hot drinks value of sales in 2014, according to the Euromonitor website.

There are many benefits of drinking tea. For one, it can help boost the immune system, as documented by the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University. Secondly, tea can rehydrate the body.

Per report from the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the caffeine content in the tea, in 200 to 250 ml of fluid, is not correlated to excessive fluid loss of dehydration. Dehydration happens when the caffeine is used in high doses or bolus. However, when it is at the minimum level, 200-250 ml, this is not significant. (Huffingtonpost, 2014).

Similarly, for those who are trying to lose weight, can also benefit from drinking green tea extract. According to the research study “Beneficial effects of green tea extract: A Literature Review,” 2010, authors, Chacko, et a.l., reported that human studies indicated that drinking green tea and green tea extract may help reduce the body weight, mainly body fat, by increasing postprandial thermogenesis and fat oxidation. (US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health).

Vital Nutrients

Green tea extract contains a significant phytochemical called polyphenol called epigallocatechin-3-gallate, or EGCG. The research findings revealed that the six overweight men, who were given 300 mg of EGCG for every two days. They have the potential to increase fat oxidation or burning of fats.

Green tea’s contribution to anti-obesity is vital. What remains a challenge for those who want to see the  promising results of green tea in relation to weight loss, is the brand or type of green tea extract to purchase. There are many competing brands in the market today, both online and offline and picking one can be difficult.

Temi Green Tea

Lush green gradient slopes of Temi Tea Estate are perfect for the world fine black and green tea. The green tea is prepared by the days when the pluckers bring the fine green leaves which are then taken in for steaming rolling and drying. This gives a right mix of exposure for gentle oxidation during rolling and not a strong fermentation like the Orthodox Temi Black Tea.

The Temi green tea is not only 100% organic but also uses processes which are sans use of pan frying. Temi green tea is loaded with antioxidants and aids brain function, fat loss and the risk of cancer. Temi green tea is a perfect cup relisted as flowery liquor with a gooseberry after taste.

Tea Preparation Guidelines

Tea preparation is a personal event, and carries with it tradition and history. It is unique to each person’s preferences. For tea newbies and those seeking a truly immersive experience, we have outlined the basics to assist you in brewing the ultimate cup.

Water

Always use fresh cold water to prepare tea. Purified and spring water are best because they are relatively free from pollutants, which will negatively affect the tea’s taste while still possessing natural mineral content, which will enhance the tea’s flavor. Distilled water should be avoided since the lack of minerals may leave the tea tasting flat.

Bring water to full, steady boil before preparing the tea. At this point, the water is sufficiently heated and has a good oxygen content. In contrast, using water that has been held at a fierce, rolling boil can leave tea tasting dull and flat. Pre-heated water from the faucet has mostly likely been overheated, losing oxygen content while picking up potentially harmful substances from the water pipes.

Temperature

To prepare a green or white tea, allow the hot water to rest for 3-5 minutes before pouring. This will bring the water down to an ideal temperature: between 150-160 for Green Tea and 180-190 for White Tea. Because of its more delicate processing, green and white teas need a cooler temperature to bring out their flavor without denaturing the leaves. Red and black teas, which are hardier and have been fully oxidized, need much hotter water to bring out their characteristic baked sweetness. They can be added to water immediately after boiling.

Duration of Infusion

Similar to water temperature, different kinds of tea need to brewed for different lengths of time. Green Tea needs to be brewed for 2-4 minutes to achieve full flavor without bitterness. White Tea should be steeped for 4-6 minutes, as the leaves are less processed and require more time to infuse. Black and Red Teas can be steeped for 4-7 minutes to achieve maximum flavor. We recommend sampling a variety of steeping times to see which is your favorite!

Teapot Material

If using a teapot to serve the tea, the material of the teapot will affect the quality of the infusion. Consider the variety of tea and the temperature at which it is best prepared. Metals like iron or Chinese yixing ware are great at retaining heat, making them more suitable for teas that steep at higher temperatures, like Black or Red Teas. Glass or porcelain are more likely to release heat, making them better suited for a Green or White Tea.

General Guidelines

  1. Bring cold water to a boil in a kettle
  2. When water is at a gentle boil, remove heat.
  3. Pour hot water into teapot or teacups and then discard.  Pre-warming guarantees a consistent temperature.
  4. Add the proper amount of tea leaves or tea bags per person to the pot, or your mug.
  5. Allow water to cool to the proper temperature, if necessary, and pour over the tea leaves or bags.
  6. Steep for the proper length of time.
  7. Strain completely into another teapot or directly into the serving cups or remove tea bags from teapot or mug at this point.

Health effects of tea

According to legend, the health effects of black tea have been examined ever since the first infusions of Camellia sinensis about 4700 years ago in China. Emperor Shennong claimed in The Divine Farmer’s Herb-Root Classic that Camellia sinensis infusions were useful for treating a variety of disease conditions.

Historically as well as today, in regions without access to safe drinking water, the boiling of water to make tea has been effective in reducing waterborne diseases by destroying pathogenic microorganisms. Recently, concerns have been raised about the traditional method of over-boiling tea to produce a decoction, which may increase the amount of pesticides and other harmful contaminants released and consumed.

Black tea has been studied extensively for its potential to lower the risk of human diseases, but none of this research is conclusive as of 2015.

By constituents or substances
Aluminum, iron and other metals
Further information: Aluminum § Health concerns

Tea drinking accounts for a high proportion of aluminum in the human diet. The levels are safe, but there has been some concern that aluminum traces may be associated with Alzheimer’s disease. A recent study additionally indicated that some teas contained possibly risky amounts of lead (mostly Chinese) and aluminum (Indian/Sri Lanka blends, China). There is still insufficient evidence to draw firm conclusions on this subject.

Most studies have found no association between tea intake and iron absorption. However, drinking excessive amounts of black tea may inhibit the absorption of iron, and may harm people with anaemia.

Fluoride exposure

All tea leaves contain fluoride; however, mature leaves contain as much as 10 to 20 times the fluoride levels of young leaves from the same plant.

By conditions

Cancer

In 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reported that there was very little evidence to support the claim that green tea consumption may reduce the risk of breast and prostate cancer.

The US National Cancer Institute reports that in epidemiological studies and the few clinical trials of tea for the prevention of cancer, the results have been inconclusive. The institute “does not recommend for or against the use of tea to reduce the risk of any type of cancer.” … “Inconsistencies in study findings regarding tea and cancer risk may be due to variability in tea preparation, tea consumption, the bioavailability of tea compounds (the amounts that can be absorbed by the body), lifestyle differences, and individual genetic differences.” Though there is some positive evidence for risk reduction of breast, prostate, ovarian, and endometrial cancers with green tea, it is weak and inconclusive.

Meta-analyses of observational studies have concluded that black tea consumption does not appear to protect against the development of oral cancers in Asian or Caucasian populations, the development of esophageal cancer or prostate cancer in Asian populations, or the development of lung cancer.

Cardiovascular disease

Black tea consumption may be associated with a reduced risk of stroke. Green tea and black tea both have a beneficial effect on endothelial function (and thus arterial health). However, the addition of milk to the tea completely blunts the tea’s artery-relaxing effects.

A 2013 Cochrane review of randomized controlled trials (RCT) greater than 3 months duration concluded that long-term consumption of black tea slightly lowers systolic and diastolic blood pressures (about 1–2 mmHg). This conclusion was based on limited evidence. Another meta-analysis of RCTs reached a similar conclusion.

Cognitive decline

Tea may have a protective effect against age-related cognitive impairment/decline and dementia later in life, based on correlations found in epidemiological studies; if there is a protective effect it is not dependent on dose and there appears to be a stronger effect for women than men. However, the association is not found in all cognitive domains investigated.

Fracture risk

Tea consumption does not appear to affect the risk of bone fracture including hip fractures or fractures of the humerus in men or women.

Hyperlipidemia

A 2013 Cochrane review concluded that long-term black tea consumption lowers the blood concentration of LDL cholesterol by 0.43 mmol/L (or 7.74 mg/dL).

Weight loss

Green tea is commonly believed to be a weight loss aid, but there is no good evidence that its consumption has any meaningful benefit in helping overweight or obese people to lose weight, or that it helps them to maintain a healthy body weight.
The fluoride content of a tea leaf depends on the leaf picking method used and the fluoride content of the soil from which it has been grown; tea plants absorb this element at a greater rate than other plants. Care in the choice of the location where the plant is grown may reduce the risk. It is speculated that hand-picked tea would contain less fluoride than machine-harvested tea, because there is a much lower chance of harvesting older leaves during the harvest process. A 2013 British study of 38 teas found that cheaper UK supermarket tea blends had the highest levels of fluoride with about 580 mg per kilogram, green teas averaged about 397 mg per kg and pure blends about 132 mg per kg. The researchers suggested that economy teas may use older leaves which contain more fluoride. They calculated a person drinking a litre of economy tea per day would consume about 4 mg of fluoride, the maximum recommended amount of fluoride per day but below the maximum tolerable amount of 10 mg fluoride per day.

Theanine and caffeine

Tea also contains theanine and the stimulant caffeine at about 3% of its dry weight, translating to between 30 mg and 90 mg per 8 oz (250 ml) cup depending on type, brand and brewing method. Tea also contains small amounts of theobromine and theophylline. Dry tea has more caffeine by weight than dry coffee; nevertheless, more dry coffee than dry tea is used in typical drink preparations, which results in a cup of brewed tea containing significantly less caffeine than a cup of coffee of the same size.

The caffeine in tea is a mild diuretic. However, the British Dietetic Association has suggested that tea can be used to supplement normal water consumption, and that “the style of tea and coffee and the amounts we drink in the UK are unlikely to have a negative effect [on hydration]”.

 

Sources from Wikipedia